The Expert Assistant’s Assembly

As many of you saw on our live Twitter feed from the studio – see right, “It’s Happening Right Now …” – our itinerant expert assistant joined us last week from the Isle of Arran (just off the west coast of Scotland).

He it was who assembled this Celtic Cross and Saints Francis and Martha most elegantly for us.

And, in response to your questions, we are now preparing a new guide. It explains the way we used here of painting a stained glass face – Saint Martha’s face, she who is the patron saint of hotel-keepers and housewives. (Thus her keys and ladle.)

What’s more, you’ll also get a fine selection of online video. That’s right, you’ll actually be able to see us take a blender to Martha’s nose. And if that isn’t a sign of an Open Society, I don’t know what is.

“When?”

As soon as we can.

In the meantime, we must arrange to put this cross and the good saints in their proper place.

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2 thoughts on “The Expert Assistant’s Assembly

  1. Hi Fellows!

    Is it too much to ask – and I think I speak for most of your followers – but a couple of clips on proper assembly would be very nice.

    I understand it is not “painting”.

    But … we cannot have one without the other.

    And also – I am just curious – do you do any foil work?

    Best,
    Scott

  2. Scott, thank you for your request. The next time we have a suitable project, we’ll film some careful leading. As you rightly suggest, fine painting plus poor leading is a waste.

    As for copper-foiling, yes, we do, though this is nearly all for conservation work, not new work. This just comes down to the architectural scale of what we usually make.

    Thanks again for your suggestion about what to film. It’s greatly appreciated.

    And if you and others will alway say what’s useful to you, then we, for our part, will always do our best to oblige. You all give us so much by helping us escape from an otherwise mainly private world which easily turns too much in on itself.

    All the best,
    Stephen